Racial Justice

The ACLU has been working for racial justice since the founding of the organization in 1920. The ACLU of Oregon’s racial justice work cuts across many areas, including criminal justice, education, free speech, immigrants’ rights, national security, police practices and religious freedom.

Guaranteeing liberty and justice for all requires us to address not only overt discrimination, but also those government policies and practices that result in disproportionate impacts related to race and ethnicity. For example, data collected over many years by some Oregon police agencies consistently has shown that African-American and Latino drivers stopped for traffic violations are more likely to be subjected to discretionary searches by police officers, but that police are less likely to find evidence of a crime in those searches than when the vehicles of white drivers are searched. This type of racial profiling may or may not be intentional on the part of police officers, but the impact on real people is harsh and inequitable.

Similar disparities exist throughout the educational and criminal justice systems in Oregon. Indeed, the ACLU’s review of discipline in Oregon public schools has shown that many students of color are more likely to be suspended or expelled than their white counterparts, and a similarly disproportionate number of students of color are tangled in our youth justice system. We refer to this trend as the school-to-prison pipeline.

ACLU Report: Oregon’s School-to-Prison Pipeline Update

Actualización: Camino de la Escuela a la Prisión en Oregón

July 1, 2013 – The ACLU Foundation of Oregon today issued a follow-up report confirming that many students of color in Oregon public schools continue to be more frequently expelled or suspended than their white peers.

The ACLU report, based on 2011-12 data reported by school districts to the Oregon Department of Education (ODE), indicates that the statewide disparity is most dramatic for African-American students. For example, African-American students represent 2.5% of the student population statewide, but received 6.5% of all out-of-school suspensions.

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Litigation

ACLU Challenges Multnomah County Sheriff's Office for Unlawful Imprisonment

September 5, 2012 - The ACLU Foundation of Oregon filed a lawsuit today against the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office for unlawfully detaining a Portland resident at the request of federal immigration officers despite a judge’s order releasing him on his state charges.

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Judge Overturns Anti-Immigrant Measure

Measure 5-190 Exceeded Columbia County Jurisdiction and Violates Federal Law

UPDATE: July 2009 – The court entered the ACLU’s proposed summary judgment order and general judgment on May 28, 2009.

April 13, 2009, St. Helens - A Columbia County judge today overturned an anti-immigrant ballot measure approved last fall because it conflicts with federal immigration law and would have required the county to take enforcement actions beyond its authority.

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Legislation

EQUAL PROTECTION: Allow Legislators to Request Racial Impact Statements (SB 463) (2013)

Modeled after the concept of utilizing fiscal and environmental impact statements before pursuing legislation that might affect the state’s budget or projects that might affect environmental interests, SB 463 sets up a process for racial impact statements to inform legislative action in Salem.

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EQUAL PROTECTION: Reverse Ban on Native American Mascots in Schools (SB 215) (2013)

In 2012 the State Board of Education voted to ban Indian mascots, imagery and logos in Oregon’s public schools. As a response, Senator Jeff Kruse (R-Roseburg) introduced SB 215 to essentially reverse that ban.

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Other

Marijuana Arrests and Citations on the Rise in Oregon

June 5, 2013 - A report issued this week by the National ACLU, based on state crime reports provided to the FBI, shows that Oregon law enforcement agencies increased the rate of citations and arrests for possession of marijuana by 45% between 2001 and 2010. Oregon’s increase was the fifth highest in the country during that period. Nationwide, African-Americans were 3.7 times more likely to be arrested for possession of marijuana than Whites despite comparable usage rates.

Analysis by the ACLU of Oregon of data made available by the Oregon State Police, shows that 90% of the marijuana possession incidents in 2010 involved less than 1 ounce of marijuana, which is punishable as a violation under state law and does not lead to arrest or jail time. That same data shows that Lane County reported the highest number of marijuana enforcement actions in 2010 with 16.7% of all marijuana possession citations and arrests statewide. Jackson County was second with 13.2%, Multnomah County was third with 8.32%, and Marion County was fourth with 7.0% of the statewide total for marijuana possession citations and arrests.

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Civil Rights & Education Advocates Applaud State Department of Education Website Disclosing Suspension and Expulsion Data of Students of Color

June 18, 2012 – Five civil rights and education reform organizations today applauded the launch of a new website created by the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) making disciplinary data in school districts across the state more accessible to the public and say it is an important step towards reducing the disproportionate discipline of students of color in Oregon public schools.

The launch of the state database came at the request of the organizations after the American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon released its report on the School to Prison Pipeline in Oregon in 2010. That report highlighted dramatic disparities in disciplinary action for students of color compared to their white counterparts, as well as increased contact with the juvenile justice system.

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